Monitoring the Effects of Recreational Use on Colorado River Beaches

Monitoring the Effects of Recreational Use on Colorado River Beaches

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Details: Museum of Northern Arizona Bulletin 55 

 

Monitoring the Effects of Recreational Use on Colorado River Beaches in Grand Canyon National Park 

by Dr. Barbara G. Phillips, Robert A. Johnson, Dr. Arthur M. Phillips, III, and Nancy J. Brian 

©1986 Museum of Northern Arizona Press 

ISBN 0-89734-057-4. 

This river-monitoring study was designed to assess and develop measures to mitigate recreation-induced impacts, both ecological and aesthetic, in the Colorado River corridor in Grand Canyon National Park.  The following hypotheses are include: 1) Density of negative aesthetic indices (litter, human feces, charcoal, ant hills, and changes in sand color from the incorporation of charcoal and human debris) are higher on heavy use sites than on light use sites; 2) Changes in the plant community among sample periods occur faster on heavy use sites than on light use sites; 3) Aesthetic indices and the plant community are influenced by the differing use patterns within the campsite; and 4) Changes in the plant community are a result of a combination of successional and degrading factors. 

 

INTRODUCTION, pages 1-6 

Project Objectives, page 1 

Hydrologic History, pages 1-2 

Human History, page 3 

Vegetation History, page 4 

PROJECT BACKGROUND, pages 7-8 

SITE DESCRIPTIONS, pages 9-22 

METHODS, pages 23-26 

Aesthetic Indices, page 23 

Transects, pages 23-24 

Belt Transect, page 25 

Vegetation Maps, page 25 

Comparison of 1973 and 1982 Photographs, page 25 

RESULTS, pages 27-88 

Aesthetic Indices, pages 27-28 

Vegetation Plots and Transects, pages 28-46 

Mapping Results, pages 44-78 

Comparison of 1973 and 1982 Photographs, pages 79-88 

DISCUSSION, pages 89-94 

Scheduling, page 89 

Site Selection, page 89 

Methods, pages 89-91 

Aesthetic Indices, page 91 

Study Site Vegetation Evaluation, page 91 

Comparison of 1973 and 1982 Photographs, page 94 

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS, page 95 

  


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